CT Scan Brain / CT Scan Head:

A CT of the brain is a noninvasive diagnostic imaging procedure that uses special X-rays measurements to produce horizontal, or axial, images (often called slices) of the brain. Brain CT scans can provide more detailed information about brain tissue and brain structures than standard X-rays of the head, thus providing more data related to injuries and/or diseases of the brain to help assess head injuries, severe headaches, dizziness, and other symptoms of aneurysm, bleeding, stroke, and brain tumors. It also helps your doctor to evaluate your face, sinuses, and skull or to plan radiation therapy for brain cancer. In emergency cases, it can reveal internal injuries and bleeding quickly enough to help save lives.

During a brain CT, the X-ray beam moves in a circle around the body, allowing many different views of the brain. The X-ray information is sent to a computer that interprets the X-ray data and displays it in a two-dimensional (2D) form on a monitor. In this case, extremely thin slices were created from the original scan and sent to a separate computer, which transformed them into these 3D images. The surgeon then used these images to aid in surgical planning to repair fractures, including one clearly visible in the jaw and others on the bridge of the nose and the outer edges of the eye sockets.

Tell your doctor if there's a possibility you are pregnant. Discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking, and allergies. If your exam needs intravenous contrast, your doctor may tell you not to eat or drink anything for a few hours beforehand. If you have a known allergy to contrast material, your doctor may prescribe medications to reduce the risk of an allergic reaction. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. You may need to change into a gown for the procedure.

Brain CT scans may be done with or without "contrast." Contrast refers to a substance taken by mouth or injected into an intravenous (IV) line that causes the particular organ or tissue under study to be seen more clearly. Contrast examinations may require you to fast for a certain period of time before the procedure. Your physician will notify you of this prior to the procedure.

Why doctor suggest CT scan brain?
A doctor may use a CT head scan to get images in an emergency, to make a medical diagnosis, or to see how well treatments are working. Some of the reasons why a doctor may order a head CT scan include:
  • looking for possible damage After trauma to the head, such as soft tissue injuries, brain bleeding, and bone injuries
  • assessing a person having stroke-like symptoms to see whether there are signs of a blood clot or brain bleeding
  • looking for a possible brain tumor or other brain abnormality
  • checking the effectiveness of medical treatments in shrinking a brain tumor
  • assessing birth conditions that cause the skull to form abnormally
  • evaluating a person with a history of hydrocephalus, a condition in which an accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid causes the enlargement of the brain ventricles


If a person is having brain-related symptoms, such as changes in personality or affected movement, a doctor may order a head CT scan to make sure that a brain abnormality is not the underlying cause.

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